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An inquirED Blog

Kindergarten Social Studies Curriculum: How can I be a problem solver?

Updated: Oct 21, 2020


Courtesy of Allison Shelley/The Verbatim Agency for American Education: Images of Teachers and Students in Action.

This blog post is one in a series that breaks down one unit from each grade level of Inquiry Journeys, inquirED's core elementary social studies curriculum. For a trial account containing all lessons for the unit, click below.


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Kindergarten Social Studies Curriculum Essential Question

How can I be a problem solver?


In this series of lessons, kindergarten social studies students investigate common problems that arise at school, analyze the possible causes, and brainstorm ways to solve them. They begin to strategize about how they can become upstanders and problem solvers, and look for challenges and opportunities within the community to prepare for taking informed action. Students conclude this module by working together to develop an Inquiry Challenge Statement that describes the action they will take, the product they will create, the people they will affect, and the goals they will work toward when they take action. Objectives include:

  • Analyze problems and their causes in various locations at school

  • Analyze strategies for solving problems at school

  • Use evidence to draw conclusions about conflict resolution

  • Predict the outcomes of actions

  • Generate ideas about challenges and opportunities related to the school community


Lesson 1: Problems at School

Students investigate the types of conflicts that can arise at school, their possible causes, and the ways to avoid them. They begin to strategize about how they can become problem solvers in the future, and even avoid problems altogether.


Lesson 2: Strategies for Solving Problems

Students investigate strategies or plans that can help them solve problems. They generate and present strategies that are specific to distinct school locations in order to prepare them for problem-solving in the future.

Lesson 3: Being a Problem Solver

Students use what they have learned to coach someone in how to solve a problem. Then, they review their learning from this unit as they prepare to design an authentic product in response to the Inquiry Question. They brainstorm ideas about needs and opportunities within their own community. 

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