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Together When Apart: Week 1 Extended Learning for Intermediate Learners

Updated: Apr 3

Below, you’ll find extension activities to help intermediate learners dig deeper into the content of their Week 1 Inquiry.

During this week’s inquiry, students examined a set of historical images. You can always dig deeper into historical photos as a primary source, challenging students to make inferences about historical setting. Try these extensions:


>>Visit "What’s Going On in This Picture?" from The New York Times to find a daily image analysis challenge.


>>Check out “40 Most Intriguing Photos to Make Students Think” for a slideshow of the editors’ favorites.


>>When discussing these images, try the following prompts:

  • Who: Who is in the picture? What do you notice about what they are wearing? What do you think their relationship is to one another?

  • What: What objects do you see? What activities do you see?

  • Where: What do you see in the background? Where do you think they’re located?

  • When: What time of day do you think this is? What time of year is it? Is this in the past or present?

  • Feel: What is your reaction to this photo?

  • Note: What will you remember most about this photo?

  • Wonder: What additional questions do you have about this photo? How could you go about answering them?


Students can also dig deeper through reading and writing activities. Try these extensions:


>>Challenge students to read a book connected to the inquiry (see suggested titles below) and identify the setting.

  • Knots on a Counting Rope by Bill Martin, Jr. and John Archambault, or access the video read-aloud

  • Thank You, Mr. Falker by Patricia Polacco, or access the video read-aloud

>>To prompt discussion or writing in response to their reading, ask:

  • Who: Who is in the story? What do you notice about what they are wearing? What do you think their relationship is to one another?

  • What: What happens during the story? What do the characters do?

  • Where: What do you see in the background of the illustrations? Where do you think the story is located?

  • When: Is this in the past or present? What time of year does the story take place in? What time of day do you think it is?


Remember! You can always repeat this inquiry in a few weeks to make a new “Here and Now Snapshot.” It’s a good way to remind students that their world is always changing!

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